Find Out If You’ll Be Able To See This Year’s Total Solar Eclipse

On August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will occur from coast to coast across the United States. This will be the first time since the county was founded that a total solar eclipse will only be visible from the United States, and it will be ninety-nine years since a total solar eclipse has swept across the entire country from coast to coast. This will be a sight to behold, and it is something that has garnered much excitement over the last several months.

I have made maps for those states in which a total solar eclipse will occur over a large geographic area. This means that the moon will fully block the sun for a certain amount of time. Keep in mind that the entire United States will get to experience at least a partial solar eclipse, where the moon will partially block the sun. So even if you don’t make it to one of the locations included in the maps below, you’ll still be able to at least experience a partial solar eclipse.

Below is a map from a neat website that depicts the maximum percentage of the sun that will be obscured during this event.

Great Eclipse Map

Source: Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

The maps that I made for each state includes the path of totality (where you’ll be able to see a total solar eclipse) and a central line with times. The times, which are in two minute increments, indicate when maximum totality will occur. Depending on your location, this total solar eclipse will occur from just over one minute to barely over two minutes and forty seconds. Firsthand Weather will eventually be releasing time duration maps, too. Take special note of the time zones that I used for each state, indicated under the title. For example, central time was used for Tennessee, even though eastern Tennessee is on eastern time.

If you’re wanting to observe this event as it’s unfolding, plan to be outside for several hours. Not only will those in the path of totality get to watch a total solar eclipse unfold but will also get to watch a partial solar eclipse before and after totality is reached. Firsthand Weather will be providing regional weather forecasts for this event later in the summer!

The maps below begin at the West Coast and end at the East Coast. If you’re closer to the East Coast, scroll down towards the bottom!

Oregon Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

Idaho Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

Wyoming Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

Nebraska Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

Kansas Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

Missouri Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

Illinois Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

Kentucky Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

Tennessee Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

Georgia Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

North Carolina Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com

South Carolina Solar Eclipse Map

Source: Matthew Holliday, FirsthandWeather.com