Old Farmer’s Almanac: Cold and Snowy Winter

Enjoy the cold and snow? Well, you’re in luck according to the 2018 Old Farmer’s Almanac, which is predicting a cold and snowy winter for much of the continental United States. This is based on a 225-year-old formula used by the Almanac, which boasts an 80% accuracy rate.

According to the Almanac, the 2017-2018 winter will be much colder than last winter. The Northern Plains will see temperatures slightly above average, but cold outbreaks and snow are still likely periodically in this region. Much of the Southern region can expect cold and wet conditions, which increases the possibility of some of the precipitation falling in the form of snow. The Great Lakes and Northeast should also prepare above average snowfall. The Pacific Northwest will cold but drier than average, which is much different than last winter when record rainfall and snowfall occurred in this region. The Southwest may see above average precipitation to aid in some drought relief.

2017-2018 Winter Outlook (Old Farmer’s Almanac)

Based on the Almanac, here’s a regional breakdown for the upcoming winter:

Southeast:
Temperatures: Average to slightly above (east), below average (west)
Precipitation: Above average

Northeast:
Temperatures: Average
Precipitation: Above average

South-central:
Temperatures: Average to slightly above
Precipitation: Above average

North-central:
Temperatures: Below average (south), above average (north)
Precipitation: Above average (south), below average (south)

Southwest:
Temperatures: Below average
Precipitation: Above average

Northwest:
Temperatures: Below average
Precipitation: Below average

Please note: this is not Firsthand Weather’s 2017-2018 winter outlook, and this does not necessarily reflect our views on the upcoming winter season. A lot of our followers enjoy the Almanac and thus this article is for their enjoyment. Firsthand Weather will have a final winter outlook in October, so keep checking back for details!

To see the entire forecast from the Old Farmer’s Almanac, click HERE!