in Breaking News, General, Local Forecasts, Severe Weather, Uncategorized, Winter, Winter Weather

Big chunk of Arctic air to move south

Tired of the warmth across southern parts of the country? No worries, it appears a strong cold front will bring an end to the warmth (for a bit at least) but we have to wait a few more days!

Models have consistently suggested a cold air mass building over western Canada and the Interior Northwest & U.S. Northern Rockies will move south and the time has come. A piece of the Arctic air mass will get dislodged, moving it south late this week into the upcoming weekend. While the air will modify as it moves south and east, due to the lack of snow cover across the Plains, it’ll still be quite cold and a shocker to the system after the recent warmth.

Timeline of the cold air

The cold air will move into the Southern Plains and Great Lakes throughout the day on Saturday into early Sunday. By Sunday morning, the cold air will rush into the Mid-South, South, Tennessee, Ohio Valleys, Northeast, and Mid-Atlantic. Then by Sunday night into early Monday, the cold air will engulf the Southeast and Carolinas. South on Sunday, and through the Southeast overnight Sunday into Monday.

Animation of the cold front delivering below-average temperatures (blue, green, and purple colors) to southern and eastern parts of the country from late this weekend into early next week (WeatherModels.com)

How cold will it get?

While it’s too early for the exact specifics and numbers, here’s a snapshot of what you could expect:

Southern Plains, South, Mid-South, and Southeast

Highs: 30s & 40s

Lows: 20s

Tennessee Valley, Ohio Valley, and Mid-Atlantic

Highs: 20s & 30s

Lows: 10s

Great Lakes and Northeast

Highs: 0s & 10s

Lows: -10s

Low-temperature forecast next Monday (WeatherModels.com)
High-temperature forecast next Monday (WeatherModels.com)

How long will the cold stick around?

The cold air will be quick-hitting. It appears the coldest air will last from Sunday through Tuesday before a quick moderate of the air mass with temperatures climbing back to seasonal averages.