Severe storms Sunday for parts of the South

We have entered meteorological spring and severe thunderstorms & tornadoes enter the forefront of people’s minds. On cue, there is a chance for severe thunderstorms Sunday for parts of the South. Moisture & warmth will grow across the region this week into the upcoming weekend. A frontal boundary and upper air system will sneak into the region late Sunday. This will be enough to help trigger showers and storms late Sunday. These storms could become strong, potentially severe, as they tap into the moisture & warmth that will build across the region.

This is still several days out so there are some questions surrounding the exact setup and what ingredients and the amount of those ingredients will come together to support severe weather. At this time, it appears the energy levels or “jet fuel” to support severe thunderstorms will be sufficient enough to allow for severe storms but not be anything too noteworthy. However, the wind directions & speed & changes in the directions & speed at different layers of the atmosphere will be pronounced enough to compensate for the lack of “jet fuel” leading to a solid chance for strong to severe storms. While early, it appears tornadoes, damaging winds, and hail are all possible late Sunday.

The Storm Prediction Center has highlighted a slight severe risk area, or a level 2 of 5, from northeastern Texas and southeastern Oklahoma into much of Arkansas, far northwestern Mississippi, southeastern Missouri, and western Tennessee. This is where there is the best chance for severe storms Sunday evening & night. Additional areas will likely be added to this risk area and upgrades are possible over the coming days.

Sunday’s severe risk area

If you live in or around this area, go ahead and keep an eye on the forecast over the coming days and prepare for the possibility of severe weather on Sunday. You will want reliable weather sources to receive weather information from along with a plan on what to do in case a warning is issued for your area.